Clinical Health Promotion Centre

WHO Collaborating Centre: Implementation of Evidence-based Clinical Health Promotion

Alcohol/Drugs - Tobacco - Nutrition - Physical Activity - Co-morbidity

Clinical Health Promotion Centre

WHO Collaborating Centre: Implementation of Evidence-based Clinical Health Promotion

Alcohol/Drugs - Tobacco - Nutrition - Physical Activity - Co-morbidity

Save the Date for this exciting seminar, arranged by WHO-CC in Malmö on November 22nd 2017.

"New knowledge about education in patient-oriented health promotion"

More information and registration will come in due course.

 

 

Written Examinations in Swedish Medical Schools: Minds Molded to Medicate?

"Today, there is overwhelming evidence for the importance of lifestyle factors in the prevention and management of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)"

Read the interesting article here

 

 

A total of about 150 000 girls and women, born in, or with both parents (or mother) from, one of the 29 countries listed by EIGE (European Institute for Gender Equality) are registered in Sweden. These 29 countries are listed as high risk for female genital mutilation by EU and UNICEF and therefore recommended to be included when estimating national risk.

We would like the Swedish national estimation to have a broader perspective and include more countries than today, says Vanja Berggren project coordinator. Since many years our Nordic neighbouring countries include more listed countries for example from the Middle East. That would have an important impact on the Clinical Health promoting work in Sweden.

Updated meta-analyses announced recently show that shorter life style changes starting before surgery have a positive effect for patients. Complications after operations can be reduced by up to 50% this way. Only intensive programs aiming at cessation of smoking and alcohol 4-8 weeks, starting before surgery have an effect on risk reduction at surgery.

- Quitting of smoking and risky drinking is part of good perioperative care that should be offered to all patients in need, says professor Hanne Tönnesen from Lund University.

Unhealthy living habits increase the risk of complications after surgery. It is well documented that preoperative smoking and drinking cessation programmes of 4-8 weeks duration, significantly reduce the increased risk of complications after surgery.

Strong for Surgery - Strong for Life is a project by Swedish Society of Medicine with the aim to increase safety for patients during surgery through intervention against unhealthy living habits, as well as reducing the risk of future illness by supporting the maintenance of a healthy lifestyle.

By integrating more effective programme for lifestyle intervention in the clinical setting, we can improve treatment results and promote faster recovery.

Read more (in Swedish) about the evidence and Strong for Surgery – Strong for Life here